BACK TO THE BASICS IN QUILTING

The simple word "quilt" can strike up a a turmoil of meanings in each person's mind. What is done, how it's done, and with what it is done is just the start of what may turn into an emotional, highly charged war of words.

I've been doing some research to see if we can come together of seeing what the term quilt might mean without adding any qualifications. Even one point of agreement would be a start.

A quilt is a product made up of 3 layers: a top, a middle, and a back. To quilt means to stitch through all three layers.

There are many ways for each step of a quilt. There are what are considered "traditional" or "purist" ways of accomplishing this, but that doesn't really get to the very basic concept of three layers sandwiched together. After that, it's really your own interpretations that will make you a quilter. Common denominators would include fabrics, threads, and needles. How you use them, again is your privilege and right to determine.

If a disagreement or elitist snobbery is starting to rear its ugly head, quickly get back to a definition on which you all can
agree: 3 layers stitched together using fabrics, threads, and needles.

Very basic? Yes, but certain to clear minds and get on a track that is agreeable to all. Making your choices each step of the way is what makes the art uniquely yours. Let no one define your art for you beyond the product created by stitching through three layers.

sewingly yours,
nancy s in wis
(all rights reserved)
 

 

RAGGEDY PATCHES

Fringed edges seem to be the really in thing. Make some appliques for your "jazzing" up garments or other things.

Embroidery a design or motif on a piece of woven cloth or "fussy" cut a print fabric. Cut a shape for your "patch" into a square, triangle, rectangle, circle, or freeform. Straight stitch this to whatever you're going to decorate, 1/4" in from the cut edge, and going around twice. Pull fabric threads on all edges to create a fringe or ragged edge.

What more could be easier? You get to use up scraps of fabrics or test embroidery designs while adding a wow! factor to your item. It's just about the easiest way of applying an applique and no edge finishing's to worry about either.

sewingly yours,
nancy s in wis
(all rights reserved)

HOME DEC ECONOMICS

Sheets are a wonderful way to sew soft furnishings for you your home. Outlets that carry sheets or even used ones from garage sales, tag sales, resale shops or whatever you have near you are sources for large pieces of fabric. Pillow cases can even be used: over backs of chairs, slipped over cushions, and even over the back and seat of a "paper clip" chair.Tie a cording or sash of sorts around the bend.

And this is just a start in how to decorate for a big wow factor but on the proverbial shoe string. Aren't you glad that you can sew?

sewingly yours,
nancy s in wis
(all rights reserved)

 

WHAT IS SEWING?

Sewing is an art. And as an art it is the joys of any art:

--imagination to new heights
--excitement from new ideas
--sensual pleasures in touching
--fulfillment through actual creation
--satisfaction of completion

With these joys, any drudgery is more than overcome. No longer is sewing just saving money. That could be done in other ways.
Sewing is a creative fulfillment of personal needs. Looked at it from this perspective can even help to make such mundane tasks as mending and altering palatable.

Since sewing is an art, nobody sets the rules or standards for you. Machine quilting and knitting are NOT cheating if they are your choices. (Funny, we don't seem to hear that accusation about machine embroidery.)

Sewing as an art--your art.

sewingly yours,
nancy s in wis
(all rights reserved)

 

BIRTHDAY PARTY TIME

Elias Howe was born on July 7, 1819.
He got the patent for the first American sewing machine in 1846. It sewed at 250 stitches per a minute.

sewingly yours,
nancy s in wis

 

FOR OUR CANADIAN MEMBERS

Word is out that Glad Press 'n Seal will be available in your stores today, July 12, 2004. A 23 meter roll will sell for $4.29 CN.

Now you can try it out too.
sewingly yours,
nancy s in wis
(all rights reserved)

 

STABILIZER MAKING CORRECTION

I have recently learned that in making your own liquid stabilizer from water soluble stabilizer (wss), water, and rubbing alcohol, the wss needs to be the plasticky kind, not like Vilene, a soft unwoven fabric sort of cloth like.

Just thought that you'd like to know, so that you don't try to make it with a wss that's not more like plastic.

sewingly yours,
nancy s in wis
(all rights reserved)